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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)
for jobs these days, there are a couple of sectors hiring and even growing. science and technology, that as we've seen in our education nation series this week, american students are far behind their global competition in science and math. there is a push to reverse the trend and it starts by training future math and science teachers. our report from our education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> reporter: sherry lamb is studying science and learning how to teach it. >> chemistry and teaching is what i really, really enjoy. >> reporter: this college junior is part of "you teach" a program that helps the next generation be a group of math and science teachers. you have always been interested? they're offering free courses, and do field work at public schools as early as the next semester. after four years, they graduate with a bachelor's degree and teaching certificate. it is no coincidence that the focus is on math and science. >> years ago, if you had a strong back you could get a job. that doesn't exist anymore. >> reporter: the united states will need an estimated 230,000 math an
very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
cool, techie-type gadgets we saw. >> he started his own company to turn science fiction into reality. >> ah! >> science nonfiction. >> starting 10, 12, 16 foot back from the screen, we can be accurate when pointing. >> john actually created technology you can in a manipulate with the use of your hands. you see in this video, gloves with sensors on fingers and backs of the palms of the hand. watch what he can do. >> moving left, moving left to right. up and down and in and out, control. >> it looks like the skyline of downtown los angeles, and he is maneuvering just using his hands and his fingers. it's just like what we see in movies like "iron man." robert downey jr. standing there, manipulating, bringing things together just with the move of his digits. >> i need the sound going -- >> gross level remote control here just with the hands. backwards. >> utilizes this technology to go through and play videos. >> how cool is it, for our show. >>> clumsy cat. [ laughter ] >> saying that sex sells. apparently that is also the case in the real estate industry in queensland, australia. here
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
? >> sam? >> it's a cumulus cloud. >> you have to try the science department. >>> this controversial headline, talking about a mom gene. there's some new research that says that could be something that actually gets that some women are better suited to give birth and be mothers. >> i have mom jeans. >> i'm wearing them now. cue the music. >>> get ready, everybody. trash to treasure in the house. it was a staple on "gaa." welcome to "gma" with this anchor showdown, like we've never done before. going to show you how to transform flea market bargains into stunning showpieces, we hope. yeah. we'll do our best, lara. >> that would be good of you. >> you might understand -- >> i'm lowering expectations, as the presidential nominees are both doing. >>> now, to the shocking murder mystery out of hollywood, that ended up with an up-and-coming tv actor dead. johnny lewis and officials say he went on a violent rampage, allegedly killing his landlady and then himself. was a designer drug behind all of it? abc's david wright has the latest from los angeles. david? >> reporter: that's the working
for concern for moms and their newborns, especially boys. a report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: jenna, like many moms, worries about producting her young kids from chemical contamination. especially the effects of the the chemical, bpa, found in plastics. >> i'm avoiding plastic in general. we try to drink out of glass. all of our water bottles, we take away with us, are reuseable. they're glass or metal. >> reporter: a new study suggests that moms may be passing along effects of bpa to their kids. in a study of 500 pregnant women, those with the highest levels of bpa have lower thyroid levels. and so did their infant sons. why only boys? scientists aren't sure. but they see the same thing in animal studies. thyroid hormones help control many systems in the body and can affect childhood development. >> if bpa is affecting the levels during pregnancy, this could be affecting the learning, memory and behavior of children later in life. >> reporter: bpa is part of many widely used plastic products. including can liners in certain bottles. most americans
the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need at our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask e wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> we have several big stories tonight, including a deadly crash in spotsylvania county. what investigators have learned so far. plus we're learning about the strange man -- the estrang
health risks. >> we had to keep pushing. science is the basis of everything. the 482 megawatt coal-fired facility owners say that the today is lesse about pollution control and more change in price for gas.al what happens now with this prime waterfront property currently owned by pepco -- >> it's an opportunity to have something exciting to happen in of mixed use development. now 15th thousand tons of begins. 15,000 tons. most of the employees have been or retired. six are still looking for work. >> jacqui jeras has a look at forecast. >> we started out really foggy northwest of the metro area this morning. here's an awesome time lapse i from oakdaleyou ijamsville.in look at the that shallow layer to awhich gave way beautiful sunny conditions. we goill change as throughout the day. clouds mostly on the increase. inyou can see them pushing from the south. that will bring a chance of rain. heavy rain across the tennessee river valley as well as parts of south.p that system will be with us the couple days. if you are traveling today, memphis, raleigh, charlotte, all of the leas. newar
drug for science. when kids get into a place like this and get blown away by their --erience >> the open house is this weekend. the first programs for all students will be coming shortly. planetarium.org site. web >> it's going to be a fun weekend. back to you. >> we will try to put the information on our web site, wjla.com. we have much more to come. we have a preview from new york of zero what is ahead on ♪ [ harry umlaut ] hey you know what, i speak european. [ sally umlaut ] european isn't a language. i think they speak all kinds over there. nah. it's basically one language with a few variations. my cousin has a passport. uh-huh. take this fascinating muller yogurt. frut up. means "fruit up." as in creamy yogurt down below. and a delectable, aromatic layer of blended fruity, moussey, uppiness on top. frut up. as the europeans say. in their language. wow. you really are biingual. yeah, i dated a comma in high school. [ male announcer ] muller. the european for yummy. [ mitt romney ] there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what... who are dep
and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. we need to -- [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half. create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got -- got an extreme makeover. [applause] but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top-down economics that we've seen before. he thinks that if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that yes, skewed toward the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be solved. jobs
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume edited by tim and i is in the publication of you have on you
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, you know, you could ar
saying the therapies have quote, no basis in science or medicine. >>> a devastating new attack in afghanistan to talk about today. a suicide bomber killed 14 people including three american soldiers in the volatile eastern province of khost. it comes a day after the death toll in the 11-year-old war in afghanistan reached 2,000. but that number does not include the number of americans injured in afghanistan and who died when they were transferred elsewhere. which would then raise the total to over 2100. nbc news has special coverage today across the middle east. lester holt joins us live now at the afghan capital of kabul. that number 2,000 representing only americans who died in afghanistan not those who were injured in the country. but didn't die until they were transported wrels. that's a big distinction. this is a major marker to reach now with the number of casualties. >> it is. and we've been talking about a number over 2100 for some time. 2,000 representing those who died here. but remember the aeromedical system is such a soldier could be wounded on the battlefield and
references 100,000 new math and science teachers as well as additional manufacturing jobs in this country. they point out during his second term, how do you break the fever or the part zan fever in washington. many democrats dismiss saying mitch mcconnell and others said they would never work with in it president from the day of inauguration. how does he put people back to work and at those jobs that he pointed out in that ad? >> i think he has to lay out exactly what he believes needs to happen in order for these jobs to be created. the one thing about debates -- >> what does he say, then? >> i think he needs to say specifically what type of policies he can push through congress. >> what would those policies be? you're an inside man and know a lot what's going on that the average voter do not. what are the policies? >> the job bills he's proposed and infrastructure spending he's proposed, additional educational spends that he's proposed held up in congress. now the challenge here is the moderator will push both candidates. jim lair is a good moderator. he's very balanced, and i don't thi
standards, improving how we train teachers. i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there. i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, we agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. i want to lower its for manufacturing. i want to close loopholes that are giving incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to give tax breaks for companies investing in the united states on energy. we agree we have to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production have been higher than they have been in years. we have to look at the energy source of the future like wind, solar, and biofuels and make those investments. all of this is possible. we have to close our deficit. we will discuss how we deal with our tax code and how we make sure we are reducing spending in a response away and have enough revenue to make those investments. governor romney's central economic plan calls for a $5 trillion
. samuel popkin who is a professor of political science at the university of san diego. he has worked on campaigns going back to the 1970s, and he is also the author of "the candidate." welcome back inside "the war room," profez or. >> it's a pleasure to be back with you governor. >> jennifer: all right. do you think this has been taken to a new level this year? >> i think it has been taken to a new level every year and gets more mindless meaningless and irrelevant every year. >> jennifer: i love that. because? because? is it going to matter? >> no, nobody cares what you thought going in. if you think your team is going to lose and they lose is that better than if you think they are going to win and they lose. [ laughter ] >> what counts is what happens in the debate not what you tell people. this is like a high school pep rally. >> jennifer: all right. i want to talk a little bit about prep because you had some very interesting experiences. you played ronald reagan for jimmy carter ahead of the 1980 debates, and in your book you write this about what hand to preside
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
. i came out with specific points that you want to make but the science of how you receive an attack, decide whether you are going to use your debate real estate to respond to the attack and how quickly you pivot to offense, offense on the point you want to make or offense against your opponent. and that to me is fascinating to watch. >> john: and we may see both candidates playing it is safe tonight knowing they have two more debates. >> al gore: i don't think so. i think the developed wisdom is the first debate matters the most. >> john: gets the highest rating. >> al gore: yeah and sets the template. and early voting has already started in a lot of these states. >> john: yeah. >> al gore: and i think mitt romney has got to take some risks, and i'm sure he has been practicing this art we talked about before. being aggressive without seeming mean. >> john: uh-huh. >> eliot: debite tonight, job numbers friday. so i think he has got to seize the moment tonight. >> cenk: when we come back we'll go to michael shure in san francisco because we'll show us
another 100,000 new math and science teachers, and create two million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states. on energy, governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels, and make those ininvestments. so all of this is possible. now, in order for us to do it, we do have to close our deficit, and one of the things i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight is
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
,000 new math and science teachers and create two million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is it too high. i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking advantage of 25%. i also want to close those loopholes that are get -- giving incentives for companies shipping overseas. i want to provide tax rates for companies here in the united states. governor romney and i both agree that we have to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar, and biofuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. in order for us to do it, we have to close our deficit. one of the things i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight is how do we deal with our tax code and how do we make sure we are reducing spending in a re
. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: jenna, like many moms, worries about protecting her kids from chemical contamination. especially the effects of bpa, found in plastics. >> i'm avoiding plastic in general. we try to drink out of glass. all of our water bottles are reuseable. >> reporter: a new stud zi suggests moms may be passing along bpa to their kids at birth. in a study, those with the highest levels of bpa had lower thyroid levels themselves and so did their sons. why boys? scientists aren't sure, but they've seen the same thing in animal studies. thyroid hormones help control many systems in the body. >> if bpa is impacting the levels during pregnancy, it could be affecting the learning of children later in life. >> reporter: it is part of many widely used plastic products. most americans have trace amounts in their bodies. while there have been many studies of bpa in animals, this is the first to show an effect on hormones in pregnant women and their newborns. in a statement, the american chemistry council said the author's speculat
's this big. so at least it's shrinking. >> that is some science right there. >> sometimes it gets down to something that simple. >>> here it is on the radar. earlier, a couple of hours ago, you had areas from frederick to warrenton all the way down south that had the moderate and heavy rain. now it is a much smaller area. you can see it as we go ahead and zoom in. moderate pockets of heavy rain still happening along 29 from columbia to bethesda in d.c., woodbridge, clinton, even diehl. all of that is headed east through areas of anne arundel county and prince george's county over the next hour. rain falling. still have a southwest wind. later today, we'll have more of a westerly wind. that will be as this weather front finally comes through. that is why i think our best chance for afternoon showers and storms will be areas east and along i-95 and down across southern maryland. as far as the weekend goes, a lot of folks asking about the weekend. i think that front will be well south and east. sunshine around the area for saturday. a little area of low pressure on sunday. could bring jus
the best workforce... in the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack obama and i appro this message. >> there was a protest today in northwest washington over smart meters. they allow passengers to pay for a cab using a credit card and a back seat. >> opponents say
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)